Adidas is ‘Here to Create’ Change in Women’s Sports

The apparel company is leading the way for equity and visibility in women’s sports

Original post by Christina Lumsden

After working many golf industry jobs, including pro shop assistant, caddie, and associate magazine editor, Christina now works independently as a marketing and writing consultant for small and start-up businesses.

While the world’s best female golfers were preparing to compete at this week’s KIA Classic in Carlsbad, Ca., just down the road, adidas Golf called together the game’s rising brand ambassadors and social media influencers to unify over one common goal: promoting women and girls in sport.

“A few stats really shocked me: girls in sports drop out 1.5 times faster than boys,” explained Courtney McHugh, senior director of global brand marketing for adidas Golf. “And if they do stay in sports, by the time they’re 17 years old 51 percent will have dropped out.

“Additionally, when you look at professional athletes, 40 percent are women; however, only four percent of media coverage is dedicated to women. We have a big issue here and adidas is committed to making a difference.”

The event continues a series of initiatives adidas has launched to promote equality for women in sports. In December 2018, the apparel company released the She Breaks Barriers campaign urging people to demand more coverage of women’s sports from their favorite media outlets. Committed to standing by that mission, adidas also announced on International Women’s Day that all adidas athletes on the winning 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup team will receive the same performance bonus payout as their male peers. It’s an action McHugh hopes creates a domino effect in all sports organizations, their apparel competitors included.

“In sport and in business there’s a lot of competition, but this is one message we need everybody to think about, so I want everyone talking about how we can get girls to enter into sport and stay in sport,” McHugh said. “It’s a movement and a message that we’re all locking arms on. We’re all competitive, but not when it comes to this—we have to stand together…”

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